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  • Dr. Brian Kott, the South Sound's first endovascular interventional neuroradiologist, is Medical Director of the Stroke Program and Neurointerventional Radiology at MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital.

    Dr. Brian Kott, the South Sound's first endovascular interventional neuroradiologist, is Medical Director of the Stroke Program and Neurointerventional Radiology at MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital.

    Tacoma General earns 'Gold Plus' for highest level of stroke care

    Only one hospital in Pierce County has been recognized for providing the highest level of stroke care.

    MultiCare Tacoma General Hospital received the 2012 "Get With The Guidelines" Stroke Gold Plus Performance Achievement Award, presented by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    The award recognizes Tacoma General Hospital’s commitment and success in providing excellent care for stroke patients, according to evidence-based guidelines. Tacoma General Hospital’s Stroke Program also has earned Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval – the highest possible – and earned the elite designation as a Primary Stroke Center.

    “Tacoma General Hospital is one of only a few institutions in the state that offers the most advanced stroke and neurovascular care,” said Dr. Brian Kott, Medical Director of the Stroke Program and Neuro Interventional Radiology.

    The hospital offers the latest treatments such as clot-dissolving medications and neurosurgical endovascular interventions. Doctors at Tacoma General Hospital can perform life-saving procedures inside the vessels of the brain to treat strokes and aneurysms without invasive surgery.

    Stroke Gold Plus

    In addition to Dr. Kott, the physician team also includes Dr. Alison Nohara and Dr. Dennis Wang.

    “When a patient is experiencing symptoms of a stroke, time lost is brain lost," said Karen Kiesz, RN, MN, CNRN, Stroke Program Coordinator. "This award recognized our staff’s dedication to providing great care and adopting the latest evidence-based treatments to improve the outcomes for our patients."

    Tacoma General ensures that patients receive treatment quickly and in accordance with nationally accepted standards.

    MultiCare's award-winning stroke program

    Rapid response teams — At Tacoma General Hospital, specially trained teams are ready and waiting 24 hours a day to provide prompt, effective evaluation and treatment for stroke. Anyone coming to Tacoma General Hospital with symptoms of a stroke is met by a specially trained team of doctors and nurses who immediately assess the patient and start emergency response protocols. The team consistently completes the exam and diagnostic tests including results to start treatment within 45 minutes. The quick treatment improves the outcome for the patient and improves the odds for recovery.

    Advanced diagnostics — Neurological assessments, such as profusion diffusion imaging, allow MultiCare's stroke teams to visualize the brain and the blood supply within seconds.

    The latest treatment options — For some patients, a rapid assessment means access to new therapies such as clot-dissolving medications. For other patients with strokes caused by cerebral hemorrhaging, MultiCare offers the latest in neurosurgical interventions.

    Expert collaboration — Close cooperation between the staffs of Tacoma General and Allenmore Hospitals, the MultiCare Neuroscience Center of Washington and the Emergency Medical System ensures the highest caliber of care to stroke patients.

    Comprehensive Rehabilitation Services — Through MultiCare, patients recovering from stroke have access to everything from nutrition counseling and social services to speech, physical, and occupational therapy. Part of our comprehensive rehab program is the inpatient rehabilitation program at Good Samaritan Hospital. This program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).

    Pioneering Physicians — Dr. Brian Kott is the South Sound's first endovascular interventional neuroradiologist. He performs life-saving procedures inside the vessels of the brain to treat strokes and aneurysms without invasive surgery. Dr. Kott is helping people get lifesaving care without an ambulance trip to Seattle — a trip that is both time-consuming and risky.

    To learn more about MultiCare's nationally recognized stroke program, call the MultiCare Neuroscience Center of Washington at 253-403-4918.

    Stroke Information

    According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability.

    A stroke occurs when not enough oxygen-rich blood is reaching part of the brain. The usual result of a stroke is paralysis of one side of the body. A stroke is an emergency situation and, like a heart attack, requires immediate medical attention. Health care providers caution that “time is brain.” About 1.9 million brain cells die each minute during a stroke. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. More than 168,000 people die each year from stroke in the United States.

    If you think someone may be having a stroke, use a simple acronym - F.A.S.T. – to assess:

    • FACE Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?
    • ARMS Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
    • SPEECH Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Are the words slurred? Can he/she repeat the sentence correctly?
    • TIME If the person shows any of these symptoms, time is important. Call 911 or get to the hospital FAST. Brain cells are dying.

    Stroke symptoms include:

    • Sudden numbness or weakness of face, arm or leg - especially on one side of the body.
    • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
    • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
    • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
    • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

    Call 9-1-1 immediately if you have any of these symptoms

    Note the time you experienced your first symptom. This information is important to your healthcare provider and can affect treatment decisions.

    Posted on May 15, 2012 in Stroke & Neurosciences, Trophy Case